A Santa Fe Xmas

BY CECELIA GUZMAN This was a wonderful book to read over Christmas. The story follows Evie And Alex. Evie bumps into Alex on the way to the family restaurant she runs and she ends up hiring him as a bartender. Things heat up between them and we learn some juicy family secrets. Also included in this book are some family recipes from the author. I love this addition as it adds a personal touch.  This is a really sweet story about the importance of family in times of grief. It also has some adorable romantic moments between Evie and Alex. I found the writing very easy to read. It was simplistic, but flowed well and the style fitted nicely in the spirit of a holiday read.  Overall, I definitely recommend A Santa Fe Xmas. It’s a quick read and a lot of fun. 

Cosmogony (A romantic drama)

CHRIS WHEAT Cosmogony follows an interracial newly-engaged couple as they uncover the secrets of their new home, the conservative small town, Goldwater, California. The novel is a quick, easy and engaging read. The writing is solid, although at times it can overuse the word, “and.” The characters feel authentic and the relationship between Isaac and Ruth is romantic and satisfying. Perfect for the romance genre.    This book packs a lot into 117 pages. There’s drama, shoot-outs, bank-robberies, government secrets, social justice, and romance. In other words, everything exciting is jammed into this short novel. However, the storyline never feels too busy, which can be a potential problem when reading complex plotlines.   What I love most about this book is the empathy. Although it’s easy to preach on sensitive topics, such as racism and sexism, this book still manages to maintain a non-judgemental tone and trusts the story to open the discussion with the reader. Overall, Cosmogony is definitely worth the [ . . . ]

Borderlanders

GILLIAN POLACK Borderlanders is about three friends who are dealing with everyday life issues, but against a backdrop of magical realism. Melissa, the main protagonist, suffers from chronic pain. Bettina is dealing with a family secret and struggling to come to terms with her psychic dreams. Zelda is writing a book while going through a difficult divorce. I enjoyed how the writer leaves Bettina’s dreams to the reader to decide whether there’s a supernatural element to them. I also appreciated the way Melissa’s chronic pain was handled. It’s rare you come across a book that addresses the toll physical illness has on a person’s mental health. I particularly loved this passage,  “She won’t give me tablets for depression because she says it’ll get better as I get better. Then, next visit, she admits I may not get better for years. Or ever. Not until we know more about things. And she sends me for tests and forgets the depression.” The author [ . . . ]

The Enchanted

J.C BRENNAN As a fan of fairytales, I was excited to pick up J.C Brennan’s The Enchanted, which tells the story of Rebecca Gentry who, not only discovers her late Grandmother’s bedtime stories are real, but also that she is of royal ancestry and comes from a long line of witches.  At first, I found the book difficult to read as some of the descriptions, particularly regarding the grandmother, dragged on. There were also moments where the writing shifted tenses. However, as the book progressed, the prose improved, and the pace quickened.  The protagonist Rebecca is very fitting for the fairytale genre, particularly regarding how she is “the chosen one.” While some reviewers weren’t fond of the cliché characterisation, I thought it worked in this book because of the presence of other classic fairytale tropes, such as the difficult stepmother, the evil witch, Rebecca gaining special powers on her 16th birthday, and the inclusion of other fantastical creatures such as vampires and [ . . . ]