Realm of Kings

BY DUSTIN B FISHER I sat on this book for a while as, although the pace picks up towards the middle and the characterization of the hero deepens, the opening is slow, and the female characters are a little problematically portrayed (more on that later).  Realm of Kings follows DT who discovers he and his friends have superpowers and are called to save the Realm of Kings.  The writing style shows promise. I know some reviewers have mentioned that there’s too much dialogue and not enough description, but I enjoyed the dialogue. It felt natural and moved the plot forwards. I thought DT was a complex and interesting character with some challenging flaws.  However, some of the female characters seem to be stereotypically sexual in their demeanor, particularly in the opening. I would have liked a little more variation with their personalities. Overall, I would recommend Realm of Kings to those who enjoy complex worldbuilding and layered protagonists.

Cosmogony (A romantic drama)

CHRIS WHEAT Cosmogony follows an interracial newly-engaged couple as they uncover the secrets of their new home, the conservative small town, Goldwater, California. The novel is a quick, easy and engaging read. The writing is solid, although at times it can overuse the word, “and.” The characters feel authentic and the relationship between Isaac and Ruth is romantic and satisfying. Perfect for the romance genre.    This book packs a lot into 117 pages. There’s drama, shoot-outs, bank-robberies, government secrets, social justice, and romance. In other words, everything exciting is jammed into this short novel. However, the storyline never feels too busy, which can be a potential problem when reading complex plotlines.   What I love most about this book is the empathy. Although it’s easy to preach on sensitive topics, such as racism and sexism, this book still manages to maintain a non-judgemental tone and trusts the story to open the discussion with the reader. Overall, Cosmogony is definitely worth the [ . . . ]

Borderlanders

GILLIAN POLACK Borderlanders is about three friends who are dealing with everyday life issues, but against a backdrop of magical realism. Melissa, the main protagonist, suffers from chronic pain. Bettina is dealing with a family secret and struggling to come to terms with her psychic dreams. Zelda is writing a book while going through a difficult divorce. I enjoyed how the writer leaves Bettina’s dreams to the reader to decide whether there’s a supernatural element to them. I also appreciated the way Melissa’s chronic pain was handled. It’s rare you come across a book that addresses the toll physical illness has on a person’s mental health. I particularly loved this passage,  “She won’t give me tablets for depression because she says it’ll get better as I get better. Then, next visit, she admits I may not get better for years. Or ever. Not until we know more about things. And she sends me for tests and forgets the depression.” The author [ . . . ]

The Enchanted

J.C BRENNAN As a fan of fairytales, I was excited to pick up J.C Brennan’s The Enchanted, which tells the story of Rebecca Gentry who, not only discovers her late Grandmother’s bedtime stories are real, but also that she is of royal ancestry and comes from a long line of witches.  At first, I found the book difficult to read as some of the descriptions, particularly regarding the grandmother, dragged on. There were also moments where the writing shifted tenses. However, as the book progressed, the prose improved, and the pace quickened.  The protagonist Rebecca is very fitting for the fairytale genre, particularly regarding how she is “the chosen one.” While some reviewers weren’t fond of the cliché characterisation, I thought it worked in this book because of the presence of other classic fairytale tropes, such as the difficult stepmother, the evil witch, Rebecca gaining special powers on her 16th birthday, and the inclusion of other fantastical creatures such as vampires and [ . . . ]

When The Lights Go Out

BY JACKIE MOJICA I received When the Lights Go Out from the author, Jackie Mojica, in exchange for an honest review.  This is an adult romance about a woman named Rain who falls in love with a famous Rockstar, Damen. I would like to begin this review by informing potential readers that the story includes light BDSM themes and explicit sexual scenes. If either of these themes disturb you, this might not be the ideal book for you. However, as someone who doesn’t like BDSM or reading explicit sex, I didn’t find these too invasive and was still able to enjoy the plot.  In fact, the sex scenes are not overly detailed, and the writing overall is solid.  The characters, Rain and Damen, are well-drawn. However, Damen comes across as borderline abusive. He is rough in the bedroom, talks about cheating on his ex-wife with the expectation that Rain feel sympathy for him, and he introduces Rain to BDSM as if it’s [ . . . ]

SHADOW OF THE RAVEN

BY MILLIE THOM When I finished reading Shadow of the Raven, I put the book aside for a week before writing a review. Not because I had nothing to say, but because it made me think. Most period novels I’ve read make me want to travel to the past and experience what it’s like to live in that time. This book, however, made me very happy to be living in the 21st century. Shadow of The Raven is the story of Eadwulf, a Mercian Royal who is betrayed by his brother and enslaved by Vikings. What the author, Millie Thom, manages to capture is the horror and uncertainty of everyday life in 7th century Europe. One day you could be a free aristocrat, and the next you could find yourself a thrall to the Danes with no rights and dependent on the master who buys you.  There’s no judgement of any of the characters in the book. Thom puts the reader into the mind of [ . . . ]

Mud and Glass

BY LAURA E. GOODIN I received Mud and Glass from Odyssey Books in exchange for an honest review. This book had me feeling a plethora of emotions. From the first page, I knew it was a well-crafted, solidly structured story. I was in awe. Then, at half-way through, it had me wanting to go out and change the world. But at the end of the book, the unexpected twist brought a sudden realisation, an epiphany if you like, of just how powerfully drawn the protagonist Celeste is. Celeste is a geography professor at Purple Bay University in the fictional country of Krasnia. We first learn that she stole her best friend and colleague, Pace’s, research because she believed that the research results, they had collected needed to be made public. Pace has not forgiven her, so we are told, even though Pace trusts Celeste to accompany her on her latest research project to uncover an important artefact, the Littoral Cortex. The book [ . . . ]