A Santa Fe Xmas

BY CECELIA GUZMAN This was a wonderful book to read over Christmas. The story follows Evie And Alex. Evie bumps into Alex on the way to the family restaurant she runs and she ends up hiring him as a bartender. Things heat up between them and we learn some juicy family secrets. Also included in this book are some family recipes from the author. I love this addition as it adds a personal touch.  This is a really sweet story about the importance of family in times of grief. It also has some adorable romantic moments between Evie and Alex. I found the writing very easy to read. It was simplistic, but flowed well and the style fitted nicely in the spirit of a holiday read.  Overall, I definitely recommend A Santa Fe Xmas. It’s a quick read and a lot of fun. 

Cosmogony (A romantic drama)

CHRIS WHEAT Cosmogony follows an interracial newly-engaged couple as they uncover the secrets of their new home, the conservative small town, Goldwater, California. The novel is a quick, easy and engaging read. The writing is solid, although at times it can overuse the word, “and.” The characters feel authentic and the relationship between Isaac and Ruth is romantic and satisfying. Perfect for the romance genre.    This book packs a lot into 117 pages. There’s drama, shoot-outs, bank-robberies, government secrets, social justice, and romance. In other words, everything exciting is jammed into this short novel. However, the storyline never feels too busy, which can be a potential problem when reading complex plotlines.   What I love most about this book is the empathy. Although it’s easy to preach on sensitive topics, such as racism and sexism, this book still manages to maintain a non-judgemental tone and trusts the story to open the discussion with the reader. Overall, Cosmogony is definitely worth the [ . . . ]

Borderlanders

GILLIAN POLACK Borderlanders is about three friends who are dealing with everyday life issues, but against a backdrop of magical realism. Melissa, the main protagonist, suffers from chronic pain. Bettina is dealing with a family secret and struggling to come to terms with her psychic dreams. Zelda is writing a book while going through a difficult divorce. I enjoyed how the writer leaves Bettina’s dreams to the reader to decide whether there’s a supernatural element to them. I also appreciated the way Melissa’s chronic pain was handled. It’s rare you come across a book that addresses the toll physical illness has on a person’s mental health. I particularly loved this passage,  “She won’t give me tablets for depression because she says it’ll get better as I get better. Then, next visit, she admits I may not get better for years. Or ever. Not until we know more about things. And she sends me for tests and forgets the depression.” The author [ . . . ]

When The Lights Go Out

BY JACKIE MOJICA I received When the Lights Go Out from the author, Jackie Mojica, in exchange for an honest review.  This is an adult romance about a woman named Rain who falls in love with a famous Rockstar, Damen. I would like to begin this review by informing potential readers that the story includes light BDSM themes and explicit sexual scenes. If either of these themes disturb you, this might not be the ideal book for you. However, as someone who doesn’t like BDSM or reading explicit sex, I didn’t find these too invasive and was still able to enjoy the plot.  In fact, the sex scenes are not overly detailed, and the writing overall is solid.  The characters, Rain and Damen, are well-drawn. However, Damen comes across as borderline abusive. He is rough in the bedroom, talks about cheating on his ex-wife with the expectation that Rain feel sympathy for him, and he introduces Rain to BDSM as if it’s [ . . . ]

Mud and Glass

BY LAURA E. GOODIN I received Mud and Glass from Odyssey Books in exchange for an honest review. This book had me feeling a plethora of emotions. From the first page, I knew it was a well-crafted, solidly structured story. I was in awe. Then, at half-way through, it had me wanting to go out and change the world. But at the end of the book, the unexpected twist brought a sudden realisation, an epiphany if you like, of just how powerfully drawn the protagonist Celeste is. Celeste is a geography professor at Purple Bay University in the fictional country of Krasnia. We first learn that she stole her best friend and colleague, Pace’s, research because she believed that the research results, they had collected needed to be made public. Pace has not forgiven her, so we are told, even though Pace trusts Celeste to accompany her on her latest research project to uncover an important artefact, the Littoral Cortex. The book [ . . . ]