Adrian O’Donnell

Adrian is one of Alex’s distant cousins and a member of his circle of friends. She is also a friend of Tilney, although he’s secretly scared of her. She would argue that if he only stopped clicking his pen in class, she would have a little more patience left for lunch and wouldn’t feel the need to point out his areas of weakness. For Adrian’s freckles, I use a technique where I take my blending stump, rub the tip in graphite, and dab it all over her face. The effect gives the freckles an authentic randomness. No individual freckle is the same shape, size or colour and this technique is a fast way to create that effect. One of my personal nightmares is drawing a mouth that is slightly open. Teeth are difficult to shape. In my previous portraits, the teeth always appear as if they’re sticking outwards. I am thankful that I have finally pulled off sketching straight-ish teeth.

Henry (Updated)

I decided to draw Henry again, but in a style closer to how I drew Alex. I originally drew Henry in a more cartoonish style, as I based it off the character in my graphic novel series. This Henry is as he appears in the novel adaptation that I’m currently working on. Still the same Henry, but drawn in a more traditional style. I’m really pleased with how he has turned out. He’s exactly how I imagine him in my head; big beautiful eyes, long thin face and generous bottom lip. His features are much softer than Alex’s because he’s more gentle and approachable – ironic, given Henry’s the shy one. In this sketch, Henry is wearing a hoodie, most likely a rather smelly hoodie as he never takes it off – if he can get away with it. The hoodie is an important part of his character because it acts as a comfort item, something that he feels helps [ . . . ]

Henry

So my first portrait is of the protagonist, Henry, from one of my online stories. There’s a crease in the picture, which is a bit unfortunate. Will be more careful with my next sketch. I decided to go for a realistic-expressionistic look to better express his personality. In this case, Henry is troubled, which is why I have him staring into the distance (how deep!). I think the eyebrows help create the troubled, but thoughtful look too. They slightly stoop in the middle. It always amazes me how subtleties of expression completely change a person’s look. If I had the eyebrows completely straight, he’d probably look quite serious. If I had, however, the eyebrows on a curve like a humpbacked bridge, he’d look rather surprised instead. Something I always struggle with is symmetry, which is another reason why I started this project. Henry’s head is on a slight angle, which means the rest of his face would be on an [ . . . ]